No Sew “Embroidered” Country Style Pillow

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This country style “embroidered” pillow is 100% no-sew and quick! Mine took under an hour and cost me $1 to make!

If you’ve been around here awhile, you may know I’m not the biggest fan of sewing – I can do it, but I avoid it when possible. Many of you have told me you don’t enjoy it either. Thus I like to come up with ways of making things that get good results but don’t require sewing. I hope you enjoy this little tutorial I’ve put together!

~ Supplies ~

1 Square Pillow Form (mine is 16 inches)

Fabric: I used a thrifted bed sheet! You will need 2 squares, each 8 inches larger than your pillow form in both directions. Example: For a 16″ pillow case I needed two pieces each 24″x24″

Linen (or similar off-white material): Whatever size you want for your “embroidered” panel

Fabric Scissors

Measuring Tape

Pencil

Fine tip permanent marker, black

Hot glue (for no-sew) OR needle & thread (for sewing option)

Optional: straight pins

“God bless our native land;
Firm may she ever stand Through storm and night.
When the wild tempests rave, Ruler of wind and wave,
Do Thou our country save By Thy great might.”

~ Tutorial ~

1. Trim off any existing seam from your fabric edges as it will be too bulky to use (I used a thrifted bed sheet, so this was necessary).

2. Cut your fabric to size. You will need 2 squares, each 8″ larger than your pillow form in both directions (for a 16″x16″ pillow form you will need two squares each 24″x24″)

3. Place the two squares one on top of the other. You will be cutting slits 4″ deep every 1 inch around the whole perimeter. To do this, measure 1″ in from the side and 4″ up from the bottom. Cut a slit up to that mark. Because my fabric was a grid pattern, I simply took note of which line was 4″ up from the bottom and always cut to that point. If your fabric doesn’t have a consistent pattern, take a measuring tape or ruler and mark off 4″ up every 1″ over from the next slit.

4. Continue doing this around the whole square. The corners will naturally get cut off when you turn to the next side. Just keep going consistently every 1″ over (and 4″ up from the bottom) – the corners will form themselves as you cut away some strips you’ve already made. Once all your strips are cut, it should look like this:

5. Line up the two squares with the fabric right side out. Take opposing strips from each square – and tie them together in a double knot. Continue doing this around the square until you have just one side open. (Sorry this is such a terrible photo – it was on my lap while I was watching tv and I didn’t want to get up, ha!)

6. Insert your pillow form into the opening. Finish tying to close up the cover.

7. Trim your linen (or other fabric) to the size you wish your panel to be. Mine was a little over 9″ wide by a little over 8″ tall.

8. Pencil in your phrase or design. (This is hard to see – sorry.)

9. Working with a light hand, use the fine tip permanent marker to trace the words/design with even dashes to mimic the look of stitching. Let dry completely!

10. You can either hot-glue the corners of your panel to the pillow for a no-sew option, or use a needle and thread to barely stitch the corners to the front of your pillow, like I did (pictured).

That’s it!

I hope you enjoy this little project! I’d love to know if you try it and how you decorate yours! Tag me on social media (@hymnsandhome) or leave a comment below!

Please note that this page contains affiliate links. Click here to learn more.

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